10 tips on how to think like a designer

by Thomas

Article by Garr Reynolds via TAXI

Below are 10 things (plus a bonus tip) that I have learned over the years from designers, things that designers do or know that the rest of us can benefit from.

When I speak around the world I often put up a slide that asks people to make as many sentences as they can beginning with the word “Designers….” The goal of this activity is to get people thinking about thinking about design, something most of us never do (it also gets people in the audience talking, loosening up a bit; always a good thing). The sentences they generate range from “Designers wear black” to “Designers use creativity and analysis to solve problems” to “Designers make things beautiful,” and so on.

These ten are broad and even a bit philosophical. Regardless of your profession, I hope there is an item or two that you can apply to your own work.

Embrace constraints
Constraints and limitations are wonderful allies and lead to enhanced creativity and ingenious solutions that without constrains never would have been discovered or created. In the words of T.S. Eliot, “Given total freedom the work is likely to sprawl.” There’s no point complaining about constraints such as time, money, tools, etc. Your problem is what it is. How can you solve it given the resources and time that you have?

Practice restraint
Any fool can be complicated and add more, it takes discipline of mind and strength of will to make the hard choices about what to include and what to exclude. The genius is often in what you omit or leave on the editing room floor.

Adopt the beginner’s mind
As the old saying goes, in the expert’s mind there are few possibilities, but for one with the beginner’s mind, the world is wide open.

Designers understand the need to take risks, especially during early explorations of the problem. They are not afraid to break with convention. Good designers are open minded and comfortable with ambiguity early on in the process, this is how discoveries are made.

Check your ego at the door
This is not about you, it’s about them (your audience, customer, patient, student, etc.).

Look at the problem from their point of view — put yourself in their shoes. This is not easy, it takes great amounts of empathy. Get in touch with your empathetic side. Empathy — an under valued “soft skill,” can be a great differentiator and is key for truly understanding a problem.

Focus on the experience of the design
It’s not the thing, it’s the experience of the thing. This is related to #4 above: Put yourself in their shoes. How do people interact with your solution? Remember that much of design has an emotional component, sometimes this is even the largest component (though users may be unaware of this). Do not neglect the emotional aspect of your solutions.

Become a master storyteller
Often it’s not only the design — i.e., the solution to a problem — that is important, but the story of it. This is related to #5 above.

What’s the meaning of the solution? Practice illustrating the significance of solutions both verbally and visually. Start with the general, zoom in to the detail, pull out again to remind us of the theme or key concept, then zoom back in to illuminate more of the detail.

Think communication not decoration
Design — even graphic design — is not about beautification. Design is not just about aesthetics, though aesthetics are important. More than anything, design is about solving problems or making the current situation a little better than before. Design is not art, though there is art in design.

Obsess about ideas not tools
Tools are important and necessary, but they come and go as better tools come along. Obsess instead about ideas. Though most tools are ephemeral, some of your best tools are a simple pencil and sketch pad. These are often the most useful — especially in the early stages of thinking — because they are the most direct. Good advice is to go analog in the beginning with the simplest tools possible.

Clarify your intention
Design is about choices and intentions, it is not accidental. Design is about process. The end user will usually not notice “the design of it.” It may seem like it just works, assuming they think about it at all, but this ease-of-use (or ease-of-understanding) is not by accident, it’s a result of your careful choices and decisions.

Sharpen your vision & curiosity and learn from the lessons around you
Good designers are skilled at noticing and observing. They are able to see both the big picture and the details of the world around them. Humans are natural pattern seekers; be mindful of this skill in yourself and in others. Design is a “whole brain” process. You are creative, practical, rational, analytic, empathetic, and passionate. Foster these aptitudes